Object Title

Flintlock muzzle-loading military carbine - Baker Cavalry Rifle

Flintlock muzzle-loading military carbine - Baker Cavalry Rifle

Date

about 1827

Object Number

XII.1885

Provenance

From the Old Tower Collection.

Physical Description

Round, rifled barrel and relieved at the muzzle to assist loading, with break-off breech. Low, brass blade foresight on top at the muzzle. Backsight is a fixed notch on a block dovetailed and brazed 3 inches from the breech. Swivel rammer. Stocked to near the muzzle, with the underside of the muzzle carrying a loop to which the rammer swivel is attached. Brass nosecap. Barrel is retained in the stock by two flat keys. Trumpet-type upper ramrod pipe, with a plain tailpipe. The left of the stock is fitted with a sling bar, attached via the sideplate screws at the rear and a screw inserted through the stock from the right at the front. Flat Baker-style lonckplate with ring-necked cock, both with light border engraving. The stock is a pistol-grip type, with brass trigger guard and buttplate. A patch box with brass cover is on the right side of the buttstock.

Techniques

Casting, Forging, Engraving

Materials

Dimensions

BarrelLength19.84 in
BarrelLength504 mm
OverallLength35.63 in
OverallLength905 mm
OverallWeight2.82 kg
OverallWeight6.2 lbs

Firearms/Artillery

Serial Number None visible

Calibre

.625 in

Inscriptions and Marks

Property mark
Broad arrow over BO
Right side of buttstock, forward of patch box
Stamped
Property mark
Crown over GR
Lockplate
Engraved
View mark
Crowned broad arrow
Lockplate
Stamped
Proof marks
Government proof marks
Barrel, at breech
Stamped
Maker
TOWER
Lockplate tail
Engraved
Unit mark
XRH
Buttplate tang
Engraved

Associations

Notes

A Baker rifled carbine was adopted for the cavalry in 1803, but it was reportedly not a popular firearm. In January 1813 an order was placed with Ezekiel Baker to convert 500 of these carbines with a pistol grip stock of his own design, which he believed to give a superior grip. Issued in November to the 10th Hussars, the new design was well received, and so in 1827 a second order was made for further conversions. At the same time, it was ordered that the manual safety catches on these carbines be removed, resulting in this model.