Object Title

2 in gun and carriage - Whitworth Patent RML

2 in gun and carriage - Whitworth Patent RML

Date

1863-1864

Object Number

XIX.264

Provenance

Presented by H.Q. Maintenance Command Royal Air Force, 1967; formerly held by R.A.F. Calshot, Hants.

Physical Description

The barrel, which has Whitworth hexagonal rifling, is quite plain and without mouldings except for a trunnion ring. The cascabel is turned with a step over which fits a brass collar the right side extended and drilled with an hexagonal passage for the rear sight. The cascabel button, which protrudes through the brass collar, is drilled and threaded for an elevating screw, that now fitted being a modern replacement. Both trunnions are inscribed MANCHESTER ORDNANCE & RIFLE Co. arranged in a circle to frame 2CWT 2QTR WHITWORTH PATENT No.107 1863. The rear sight is preserved and consists of an hexagonal brass bar, 9.9in, calibrated from 1 to 10 (yards multiplied by 10), carrying at the top a rectangular housing for a deflection leaf, now missing. That on XIX.264 is a modern copy. The top of the housing is engraved No.107.


Carriage
The gun is mounted on a rear chock carriage, all fittings being of brass with the exception of iron rings for securing and running up
The carriage is original except for the wheels and axle which have been renewed

Dimensions

Dimensions: Length: 51 in (129.5 cm), Overall length: 54 in (137.2 cm) Weight: 2 cwt 2 qtr (127 kg)

Firearms/Artillery

Serial Number nvn

Calibre

2.0 in (5 cm)

Bibliographic References

H.L.Blackmore, The Armouries of the Tower of London, Ordnance Catalogue, H.M.S.O. London 1976, p.89.

Notes

'Sir Joseph Whitworth 1803-87'
Made his first experiments with ordnance in 1856 and by 1856 was producing guns of cast steel with his hexagonal design of rifling, which fired mechanically-fitting projectiles. The Manchester Ordnance and Rifle Company were manufacturers of Whitworth patent rifles, cannon and ammunition at 51 Sackville St, Manchester, from 1863 to 1864 and at 44 Chorlton Street, Manchester, in 1865. The two guns were probably originally intended for mounting on an armed yacht.