Object Title

Percussion double-barrelled shotgun

Percussion double-barrelled shotgun

Date

1840

Object Number

XII.3480

Physical Description

The locks have been converted from the latest type of flint bar locks, by cutting away and filling in sections of the plate. They now form bar locks with flat front edges. They are fitted with sliding safety bolts, squared-off tails recessed or stepped down, and are engraved with an attempt to imitate Manton-type scrolls, but without dragon-heads. The cocks are flat with later Birmingham scrollwork up the bodies. The standing breech is of new production, not converted, with deeply curled fences. Lockplates engraved 'Joseph Manton LONDON' in two lines.
Half-stocked, the barrels being retained by one slide with oval silver escutcheons. Iron mounts are engraved with flint period scrolls and borders in imitation of the style used by Manton's engravers, but not so well executed. Large guard bow, shorter front trigger. Deep fore-end not in flint style. Octagonal silver escutcheon inlaid in top of small. Chequered fore-end and small not in flint style. Highly polished stock of average quality walnut.
Barrels have narrow concave rib. New breechplugs have been fitted to effect the conversion, with no vent plugs, and flower heads engraved at that point. Undersides of barrels are stamped 4464, and no visible proof marks. The rib is engraved in copper plate script, 'Joseph Manton, London.' Left breech bar missing

Dimensions

OverallLength1099 mm
BarrelLength711 mm

Firearms/Artillery

Serial Number 4464

Calibre

18 bore

Associations

Places Britain

Notes

It is probable that this gun represents a type made during the late 1830's and 1840's bearing the names of famous makers of the late flint period such as Nock, Baker and Manton. There was a considerable hue and cry raised in the sporting press, but there appears to have been little done about it, since the guns were never fully marked with the street address of the supposed maker; only if this were done could action be taken. This type of weapon was largely sold to the neophyte sportsman who was strongly advised against purchasing a second-hand gun.