Object Title

24 pr gun

24 pr gun

Date

1722-1742

Object Number

XIX.323

Provenance

Purchased April 1984. This gun had been used as a bollard outside the Royal Arsenal, Woolwich and had to be moved to make way for the new road.

Physical Description

The cascable consists of a plain, spherical button with fillet and two ogee mouldings with plain fillets. The base ring is a plain band with fillet and ogee moulding. Twelve degrees are marked off at each side on the band. The vent is oval-shaped in a raised pan. The vent field is marked by an astragal and 2 fillets. There is an engraved line as backsight
The first and second reinforce consists of 3 plain bands and ogee mouldings. The third reinforce and muzzle have an engraved line acting as a foresight.
Marks consist of 50-0-0 and broad arrow engraved, in the first reinforce and 80 (set sideways) and crowned GR monogram.
On the trunnions are the remains of number (?) engraved on each face; on the left ?7? and ?20 on the right

Dimensions

Dimensions: Length overall: 126 in (320 cm), First reinforce: 33 in (83.5 cm), Second reinforce: 22 in (55.95 cm), Chase: 58 in (1474.5 cm) Weight: 50 cwt

Firearms/Artillery

Serial Number nvn

Calibre

6 in _ (15 cm)

Associations

Places Britain

Notes

The characteristics of both guns 323 and 324 fit with Adrian B Caruana's Armstrong System (illustrated in Canadian Journal of Arms Collecting. Vol 24; p 131-137; vol 25 13-19). He claims this was introduced by Col. John Armstrong, Surveyor of the Ordnance from 1722.


The guns appear to be very large for this calibre. They may have been originally cast as large calibre guns but were changed. However Caruana in the second article inferred to above, cites a notebook written in 1827 by Officer Cadet J Cockburn which includes an iron 24 pounder, weighing 50 cwt and 9.5 ft long which he describes as for Fortresses and Battering Trains, also in some 1st and 4th rates (op cit p.16).
XIX.323 and 324 were found with 12 other similar guns and smaller unmarked guns, being used as bollards at Woolwich Dockyards. The remaining guns are thought to have gone to Australia.