Object Title

Mortar - British Bronze Coehorn Mortar

Mortar - British Bronze Coehorn Mortar

Date

1740

Object Number

XIX.242

Provenance

Cast for the Board of Ordnance`s collection of artillery.

Physical Description

This mortar has the usual long bar at its base which act as the trunnions. Affixed to this are shoulders either side of the vent filked of the main barrel. Around the vent is a half cup in the style of a shell. Above this is a vent field astragal and fillets separating the vent field from the reinforce. Separating this from the chase is a reinforce ogee and single fillet on the breech side. The chase is short with an ogee and muzzle astragal and fillets at the muzzle. The reinforce bears the monogram of George II in slight relief. The right trunnion is engraved with the registered number 230 and the left with the weight 0-3-7. The foundry number 79 is stamped on the under side of the breech. The Bed, which is a modern replica, is of a plain wooden rectangular construction with four iron carrying handles, two either side. The trunnions are held by simple metal strips.

Techniques

Cast

Materials

Dimensions

BarrelBore115 mm
BarrelLength340 mm
BarrelWeight41.3 kg
ChamberDiameter50 mm
BedLength603 mm
BedWidth237 mm

Firearms/Artillery

Serial Number 230

Calibre

115 mm

Inscriptions and Marks

Weight
0 - 3 - 7
Left trunnion
Engraved
Number
230 [Registered number]
Right trunnion
Engraved
Serial number
79 {Foundry number]
Underside of the breech
Stamped
Royal cipher
George II
Reinforce
Slight relief

Associations

Bibliographic References

H.L.Blackmore, The Armouries of the Tower of London, Ordnance Catalogue, H.M.S.O. London 1976, p.98-99.

Notes

A Coehorn Mortar is a lightweight mortar originally designed by the Dutch military engineer Baron Menno van Coehorn (1641-1704). In 1713 the first Coehorn mortars appear and in 1726 Royal mortars are listed as well. The Coehorn mortar was the smallest of the standard mortars. Coehorn was known as the Dutch Vauban he was renowned mainly for his methods of siegecraft and fortification. His mortars were first used at the siege of Grave in 1674.