Object Title

Hanger

Hanger

Date

1630-1670

Object Number

IX.1386

Provenance

Ex Williams Collection, 1974.

Physical Description

Plain steel hilt, with cap pommel and button, knuckle-guard, an outer shell, pierced and turned towards the blade and a smaller inner shell turned towards the pommel. Grip of wood, with a single strand of spiral wire binding.


Short, slightly curved, single-edged blade, broadening towards the tip, with a fuller near the back, and a false edge for the last 210 mm It is inscribed (SIDE?), 'ME FECIT LONDON / - - ANNIS SLLL (?)'.

Materials

Dimensions

BladeLength580 mm
SwordOverall length700 mm
SwordWeight822 g

Inscriptions and Marks

Makers Marks
ME FECIT LONDON/ - - ANNIS SLLL (?)
Inscribed in fuller

Associations

Notes

During the 17th century, the term ‘hanger’ appears to have been largely interchangeable with ‘cutlass’ and referred to any short sword, usually with a curved blade, which could be comfortably worn when fighting on foot. Hangers were equally popular as civilian and hunting weapons. Characteristic features of English-made hangers of the 1640s included a mushroom-cap pommel, a large tang button and baluster decoration to the knucklebow which was frequently echoed on the quillon terminal. The hilts frequently incorporated two shell-shaped guards; the outer one larger and curved towards the point, the inner one smaller and curved in the opposite direction towards the pommel.

The hilt is generally similar to those of IX.1283 and (excepting the grip and pommel) IX.760, though these both have an unpierced outer shell with less scallops on its edge.
When displayed in Board of Ordnance Gallery, c.1982 - Dec. 1993, labelled as 'c.1635'.
Display label in (Tower) Board of Ordnance Gallery (to 1993), 'c. 1630'.