Object Title

Dagger and sheath - Quillon Dagger

Dagger and sheath - Quillon Dagger

Date

1678-1680

Object Number

X.299

Provenance

Unknown

Physical Description

Grip is of wood with wound-wire binding at the top and bottom - the middle section is missing. There is also a wire turks-head at the top and bottom of the grip. The ferrous metal pommel is plain and round, with traces of gilding. The quillons are short, straight and thin, flaring out to a lobate terminus, again with traces of gilding. The blade is of flat section, straight and double edged, with a short ricasso. There are traces of gilding around the ricasso, along with an inscription on both faces. Theese comprise of a skull and 'PRO RELIGION PROTES TANTIUM' (only religion ???) and on the opposite face 'MEMENTO GODFREY OCT 12 1678'

The sheath is of tooled leather with simple grooved, linear decoration

Techniques

Etching, Punched, Gilding

Dimensions

BladeLength216 mm
OverallLength224 mm
OverallLength313 mm
OverallWeight162 g
OverallWeight24 g

Inscriptions and Marks

Inscription
Memento Godfrey Oct.12 1678
blade
etching
Inscription
Pro Religion Protes Tantium
blade
etching

Associations

Notes

Known as a 'Godfrey Dagger'

"Sir Edmund Berry Godfrey (1621 - 1678), Justice of the Peace, was the first man to tbe presented with Titus Oates' story of the "Popish Plot". Shortly after this he disappeared and his body was found on October 17th, 1678 on Primrose Hill, transfixed with his own sword. It was assumed that he had been murdered by the Catholics, and eventually two men, Robert Green and Lawrence Hill, were hanged for the crime. The evidence remains unclear, and it is possible that Godfrey was murdered on Oates' orders, to give support to the evidence for a Popish Plot."

These daggers were produced in relatively large numbers as commemorative pieces, but were apparently popular amongst women wishing to defend themselves against would-be Jesuit attackers