Object Title

75 mm gun - 75/22 Mountain Gun

75 mm gun - 75/22 Mountain Gun

Date

1944

Object Number

XIX.906

Provenance

Purchased from Cotswold Gunsmiths. 26 November 1998.

Physical Description

This gun is the 75/22 mountain gun. The trail is a box section steel design that is jointed in its centre. the whole equipment breaks down into seven loads that can be carried by mule.The largest section is the cheeks and elevating mechanism. This consistes of rivetted plated sections with the elevating arc in between the two central transoms.Facing the breech, on the left hand side is the elevating mechnism gearbox mounted outside the left cheek.This is operated by a simple pressed steel handle and can be locked by a separate wheel. The lower trail section consists of a spade and towing eye and a small locker built into the upper half of the trail section. The shield can be removed in one unit and has four retaining keys to keep it in place.The firing mechanism is extremely simple and uses a 'martillo' or hammer to set off the primer. It is operated by a mechnical linkage from the firing lever. The whole gun breaks down into several component parts to allow it to be carried on the back of a number of mules

Dimensions

Weight: 764 kg.

Firearms/Artillery

Serial Number nvn

Calibre

75 mm

Inscriptions and Marks

'Fabricado en Sevilla' on carriage. Ano 1944' on barrel

Associations

Places Spain

Notes

This is an early Schneider design copied and introduced into Spain at the end of the Spanish Civil War (1936-39). The initial design was the Schneider 105/11 model 1919 which is exactly the same as this model but has a different tube and breech mechanism. After three years of civil war many of the old 105 guns were so worn out that it was decided to refit them with 75mm barrels to use up the remaining stocks of 75mm ammunition. The 105 mm gun originally had a de Bange obturator whereas in the 75mm gun the breech was redesigned in order to use a metal cartridge case. The firing mechanism is extremely simple and uses a 'martillo' or hammer to set off the primer. It is operated by a mechnical linkage from the firing lever.